APPLES summer intern impacts local organizaton

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By Catie Armstrong

Interns can do a lot to further an organization’s work, especially a nonprofit organization. This past summer, the Raleigh/Wake Partnership to End and Prevent Homelessness hosted Morgan McLaughlin, a senior public policy and political science double major as its first APPLES Service-Learning intern. According to Michelle Goryn, Raleigh/Wake Partnership board member, the experiences were so positive on both sides that plans are to host another intern.

morgan-mclaughlin-apples-summer-intern“From day one, Morgan contributed to projects critical to the Partnership’s efforts,” Goryn said. “The contributions Morgan made benefitted the Partnership by expanding its outreach, awareness and capacity in the community.”

APPLES internships are unique, intense experiences in service for either the spring semester or summer. Students intern at a variety of nonprofit and government organizations, receive funding ($1,250 for spring and $2,500 for summer) and academic course credit through a course hosted by the School of Social Work. APPLES interns are considered staff in their organizations and have a great deal of responsibility as well as professional growth opportunities. Interns also receive individualized academic instruction from a faculty member and hands-on experience that will help them grow as community leaders. APPLES hosted 30 summer interns.

The Raleigh/Wake Partnership to End and Prevent Homeless is a nonprofit dedicated to addressing the issues surrounding being homeless in the Triangle area and working toward both short term and long term solutions. McLaughlin’s internship helped the organization expand to better serve the homeless community.

As a summer interns, McLaughlin implemented a comprehensive communications plan, created new content for the website and social media platforms, and developed a new donation management system to accompany an updated online donation platform.

McLaughlin’s internship experience extended beyond the impactful work she did for the Partnership; she also learned more about the issues with which she was working so closely. “I learned a lot about the American homeless service system and was able to contextualize the problem of wealth and income inequality in America,” McLaughlin said.

“As our first APPLES intern, Morgan witnessed the growing needs and capacity of the Partnership,” said Goryn. “She took the initiative to establish an ongoing volunteer and intern infrastructure for people to get involved with the organization in the future. By doing this, the Partnership will continue to benefit from the valuable work of other volunteers and interns that can bring talent, energy and community commitment similar to what Morgan brought this summer.”