Public Service News 2/12/2018

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more information on CCPS, visit us online at ccps.unc.edu/. Follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill to learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

OPPORTUNITIES AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

3/12 – Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars call for applications
3/20 – SMART Mentoring applications 

UNC DISASTER RELIEF

Disaster relief trips

INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

2/16 – Jackson Center summer fellowship

EVENTS & MEETINGS

2/13 – Embody Carolina Training 
2/13 – Screening and panel discussion of “13th”
2/13 – Honors Carolina Healthcare’s Seven Dirty Words lecture
2/15 – Mental Health Ambassador training application
2/21 – Annual African-American history month lecture
2/22 – Mary Stevens Reckford Memorial Lecture in European Studies
2/25 – Voices of Freedom: Music and the Civil Rights Movement
Carolina Global Photography Exhibition

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

Help children with disabilities learn to swim
Volunteer with Challah for Hunger
Enrich ELL seeks volunteers
Baseball and volleyball coaches needed
Center for Latino Health volunteers
Be a counselor at Camp AmeriKids

OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

3/12 – THORP FACULTY ENGAGED SCHOLARS CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

The Carolina Center for Public Service is accepting applications for Class VII of the Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars program (FES). FES brings together selected Carolina faculty from across campus to engage in a two-year experiential, competency-based curriculum designed to advance their engaged scholarship. Up to 10 faculty members are selected every other year. The program is highly interactive and experiential, involving field visits, exposure to ongoing projects, and discussions with community and faculty partners. Applications are accepted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Monday, March 12. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

3/20 – SMART Mentoring applications

SMART Mentoring engages UNC undergraduate students and local middle-school students in mentoring relationships. The program targets students from low-income communities and focuses on issues of race, class and gender. SMART is designed for highly motivated students who are committed to making a positive difference in the lives of youth. Students selected to participate enroll in a fall three-credit hour course and a spring one-credit hour course. Staff from partnering organization Volunteers for Youth match SMART mentors with mentees by early September and the mentoring commitment will continue through late April. SMART is available for all undergraduate students with preference given to participants in the Buckley Public Service Scholars program. Apply online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by March 20.

UNC DISASTER RELIEF

DISASTER RELIEF TRIPS

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill continues to be responsive to communities still dealing with the impact of recent disasters. Spring relief trips will all take place at UNC’s adopted home in Lumberton, North Carolina through the North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church. Hurricane Matthew relief day trips will be Feb. 24 (hosted by APPLES Service-Learning), March 2 and April 20. All trips will leave from Memorial Hall at 7:15 a.m. and return to campus no later than 6:30 p.m. Breakfast, lunch, snacks and transportation will be provided. There are no required skills needed to volunteer, but please let us know if you have specific skills, experiences or tools that will be helpful on the work site. Visit UNC disaster relief trips for information about past trips and more details about these experiences. UNC’s disaster relief website is updated with ongoing efforts for Hurricane Matthew and other disasters. Email ccps@unc.edu with questions.

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INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

2/16 – Jackson Center summer fellowship

The Jackson Center is offering up to four graduate and undergraduate student summer fellowship positions for 2018. Fellows will work on several projects and initiatives that service partners participate in every week. These fellowships are paid positions from late May to early August. Apply at the Jackson Center by Feb. 16.

EVENTS & MEETINGS

2/13 – EMBODY CAROLINA TRAINING

Embody Carolina educates Tar Heels on how to identify and support someone with an eating disorder. The organization is hosting its February training at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 13. Register at Embody Carolina.

2/13 – SCREENING AND PANEL DISCUSSION OF “13TH”

The Sonja Haynes Stones Center for Black Culture and History is hosting a screening of “13th,” Ava DuVernay’s critically acclaimed documentary on incarceration and racial inequality, 6 p.m. Feb. 13 in the Stone Center Auditorium. A post-screening discussion panel featuring experts from the Triangle area will follow. This event is free for all to attend. See the flier for more information.

2/13 – Honors Carolina Healthcare’s Seven Dirty Words lecture

Honors Carolina presents the Frank Porter Graham lecture, Healthcare’s Seven Dirty Words, with Elizabeth G. Taylor, executive director of the National Health Law Program (NHeLP). The lecture is at 7 p.m. Feb. 13 in the FedEx Global Education Center. NHeLP is a nationally recognized legal nonprofit dedicated to protecting and advancing the health rights of low income and under-served individuals.

2/15 – Mental Health Ambassador training application

UNC-Chapel Hill Mental Health Ambassadors (MHA) promote conversation around mental health, facilitate support networks and present educative programming on the UNC campus. MHA was formed in 2017 with a vision of helping students support students, and it partners with CAPS, the School of Social Work and Dean of Students. Ambassadors will be trained in Mental Health First Aid USA. Apply by Feb. 15 using the MHA form.

2/21 – Annual African-American history month lecture

The Dr. Gerald Horne will deliver the 14th annual African-American History Month Lecture at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center. The lecture, Why Black Lives Do Not Matter: Rethinking the Origins of the USA, will be shown at 7 p.m. Feb. 21 in the Stone Center’s Hitchcock room. Visit the Stone Center for more information.

2/22 – Mary Stevens Reckford Lecture in European Studies

The 24th annual Mary Stevens Reckford Lecture in European Studies will feature Zia Haider Rahman, author of “Brexit: The Reckoning.” The lecture is at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 in Hyde Hall’s University Room; a reception will follow. The event is free and open to the public.

2/25 – Voices of Freedom: Music and the Civil Rights Movement

Gospel singer, educator and historian Mary D. Williams will perform an aural history tour of the music from the civil rights movement 3 – 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 25 at the Friday Center. The event is free to the public. Registration is requested. Call 919-962-3000, or email conferencecenter@unc.edu to register.

Carolina Global Photography Exhibition

The winning photographs of the 18th annual Carolina Global Photography Competition are now on display in the FedEx Global Education Center until July 20, 2018. For more information about the exhibition, see the flier.

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

Help children with disabilities learn to swim

The Chapel Hill Parks and Recreation: Adapted Recreation department needs volunteers to work one-on-one with students with disabilities, ages 5 – 22 years old, during swim practice. Classes are 6:30 – 8:15 p.m. on Wednesdays from Feb. 21 – Mar. 7 and Mar. 7 – April 11. For more information, contact Marian Kaslovsky..

VOLUNTEER WITH CHALLAH FOR HUNGER

Challah for Hunger is a student-run organization that bakes and sells challah and donates the proceeds to Carolina Cupboard. Sign up to bake or sell, or contact Emily Kokush for more information.

ENRICH ELL SEEKS VOLUNTEERS

Enrich ELL offers free one-on-one English classes to adults in the local community. Volunteers meet 7 – 8 p.m. on Mondays at the Chapel Hill Public Library and Wednesdays at Hargraves Community Center. Carpool is provided and no prior experience is necessary. If interested, email Kaitlyn Lightfoot.

BASEBALL AND VOLLEYBALL COACHES NEEDED

Carrboro Recreation and Parks Department is accepting volunteer coaching applications for baseball and volleyball programs. Coaches organize practices, teach playing skills, prepare the team for games, bring enthusiasm and create a positive environment. Communication with players and their families is also important. Players vary in age from 6 – 10 years old for baseball and 10 – 13 years old for volleyball. To apply, contact Craig Wolfe.

Volunteer for the Center for Latino Health

UNC’s Center for Latino Health (CELAH) needs bilingual volunteers to assist patients in navigating the UNC system in Latino health clinics, recruiting patients for research studies, assisting communication during registration and participating in community events as representatives of UNC CELAH. If interested, contact Claudia Rojas.

Be a counselor at Camp AmeriKids

Camp AmeriKids provides a traditional residential summer camp experience to children living with the challenges of HIV/AIDS and sickle cell disease. Caring, responsible, energetic and fun volunteers are needed to serve as counselors Aug. 4-11. Camp is located in Warwick, New York and room and board is included. For more information, visit The Elm Project.

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CCPS WEBSITE – FIND US ON THE WEB

The Carolina Center for Public Service (wccps.unc.edu) features the latest information about the APPLES Service-LearningBuckley Public Service Scholars, and Faculty Engaged Scholars programs as well as details about Public Service Awards and Fellowships. You can also read stories of Carolina students, faculty and staff who are making a difference. The Carolina Center for Public Service: Connecting Carolina and Communities – be sure to bookmark the site. Learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement. Visit us online, follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us today on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill.

UNC’S DISASTER RESPONSE

Whenever disasters strike – in North Carolina, the United States or around the world – Carolina students, faculty and staff immediately ask, “What can we do to help?” If you are aware of disaster response or recovery efforts being coordinated on campus that you would like listed on this page, send an email to CCPS.

ABOUT OUR NEWSLETTER

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more info on CCPS, please visit http://ccps.unc.edu. If you are involved in public service and would like to post an announcement, fill out our online request at http://ccps.unc.edu/news-events/public-service-news-listserv/next-weeks-listserv/. The deadline for inclusion is 5 p.m. on the Wednesday prior to Monday publication. The Public Service News is published only when class is in session, once per week during the academic year and bi-weekly during the summer sessions. To unsubscribe, click here or, send a blank email to leave-34847996-76489955.07b7484471051a00b41b3bf1990b60eb@listserv.unc.edu. Thank you.

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Public Service News 2/5/2018

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more information on CCPS, visit us online at ccps.unc.edu/. Follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill to learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

OPPORTUNITIES AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

2/5 – Apply to be a Community Engagement Fellow
2/6 – Outward Bound scholarships 
2/7 – Ned Brooks Award
2/7 – Office of the Provost Awards
2/7 – Robert E. Bryan Awards
2/8 – Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award
2/8 – Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship
3/12 – Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars call for applications

UNC DISASTER RELIEF

Disaster relief trips

INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

2/11 – Chancellor’s Fellowship
Center for Community Capital internship

EVENTS & MEETINGS

2/13 – Embody Carolina Training
2/13 – Screening and panel discussion of “13th”
2/19 – Rescheduled UNC MLK lecture and award ceremony
2/21 – Annual African-American history month lecture

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

3/24 – Community Egg Hunt
Volunteer with Challah for Hunger
Enrich ELL seeks volunteers
Volunteer with TABLE
Baseball, volleyball and field hockey coaches needed
Rodeo on Rosemary needs volunteers
Carolina Cupboard needs basketball volunteers

OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

2/5 – APPLY TO BE A COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT FELLOW

The Community Engagement Fellowship program awards a maximum of seven fellowships of up to $2,000 each year to develop and implement engagement or engaged scholarship projects that employ innovative, sustainable approaches to complex social needs and have an academic connection. Returning, full-time graduate students at UNC-Chapel Hill are eligible to apply. Previous fellows are eligible to apply for an additional year of funding. To apply, submit a project proposal, sustainability plan, budget, applicant resume(s), a letter of endorsement from a faculty mentor and second letter from a community partner by Feb. 5 through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal.

2/6 – OUTWARD BOUND SCHOLARSHIPS

The Carolina Center for Public Service awards Outward Bound scholarships for undergraduate students at UNC-CH to participate in a 28-day course over the summer through North Carolina Outward Bound School (NCOBS). Recipients receive full tuition for the NCOBS course and Wilderness First Aid certification through its completion. Apply by Feb. 6 through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal.

2/7 – NED BROOKS AWARD

The Ned Brooks Award for Public Service honors the contributions and values of Ned Brooks, who has served the University since 1972, making significant contributions to the mission of service and engagement. The award recognizes a staff or faculty member of the UNC-Chapel Hill community who throughout his/her career has, in a collaborative and sustained manner, made a difference in the larger community. Full nominations are due by 11:59 p.m. Feb. 7, 2018. Online nominations will be accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/7 – OFFICE OF THE PROVOST AWARDS

Nominations are being accepted for the Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Awards. Three Provost awards are given, one each for engaged teaching, engaged research and engaged partnership. The award requires a brief two-paragraph nomination submitted by Feb. 7. Selected nominees will be invited to complete a more detailed submission about their work by Feb. 28. Final selection will be based on both the initial nomination and the nominee application. Nominations are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/7 – ROBERT E. BRYAN AWARDS

Nominations are being accepted for the Robert E. Bryan Public Service Awards. Five Bryan Awards will be given for a specific effort (rather than an overall record) exemplifying outstanding engagement and service to the state of North Carolina. Bryan awards will be given to recognize an outstanding undergraduate student, graduate student, faculty member, staff member and officially recognized student organization. The award requires a brief (two-paragraph) nomination submitted by Feb. 7. Selected nominees will be invited to complete a more detailed submission about their work by Feb. 28. Final selection will be based on both the initial nomination and the nominee application. Nominations are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/8 – RONALD W. HYATT ROTARY PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD

Applications are being accepted for the Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award. Two awards will be given, one (up to $3,000) for an international project and one (up to $2,000) for a local project. If the local project involves members of the Chapel Hill Rotary Club in some way, there is a possibility of additional funds. Undergraduate or graduate students at the UNC-Chapel Hill are eligible to apply, individually or in teams. Applicants must be continuing their studies at UNC-Chapel Hill in the following fall semester. Applications can be submitted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Feb. 8. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/8 – MINGMA NORBU SHERPA FELLOWSHIP

Applications are being accepted for the Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship. Eligible applicants must be an undergraduate or graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill continuing their studies at UNC-Chapel Hill in the semester following their fellowship. Applications are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal until Feb. 8. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

3/12 – THORP FACULTY ENGAGED SCHOLARS CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

The Carolina Center for Public Service is accepting applications for Class VII of the Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars program (FES). FES brings together selected Carolina faculty from across campus to engage in a two-year experiential, competency-based curriculum designed to advance their engaged scholarship. Up to 10 faculty members are selected every other year. The program is highly interactive and experiential, involving field visits, exposure to ongoing projects, and discussions with community and faculty partners. Applications are accepted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Monday, March 12. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

UNC DISASTER RELIEF

DISASTER RELIEF TRIPS

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill continues to be responsive to communities still dealing with the impact of recent disasters. Spring relief trips will all take place at UNC’s adopted home in Lumberton, North Carolina through the North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church. Hurricane Matthew relief day trips will be Feb. 24 (hosted by APPLES Service-Learning), March 2 and April 20. All trips will leave from Memorial Hall at 7:15 a.m. and return to campus no later than 6:30 p.m. Breakfast, lunch, snacks and transportation will be provided. There are no required skills needed to volunteer, but please let us know if you have specific skills, experiences or tools that will be helpful on the work site. Visit UNC disaster relief trips for information about past trips and more details about these experiences. UNC’s disaster relief website is updated with ongoing efforts for Hurricane Matthew and other disasters. Email ccps@unc.edu with questions.

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INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

2/22 – Chancellor’s fellowship

The Office of the Chancellor at UNC-Chapel Hill is seeking self-motivated and engaged graduating seniors to apply for the 2018-19 Chancellor’s Fellowship. This opportunity allows recent graduates to explore and understand the inner workings of a higher education institution. This is a paid full-time, one-year appointment beginning in June 2018. For more information and to apply, visit Careers at Carolina. Applications are due Sunday, Feb. 11.

CENTER FOR COMMUNITY CAPITAL INTERNSHIP

The Center for Community Capital seeks a graphic design intern and communication interns for spring 2018. The Center for Community Capital, a non-partisan, multi-disciplinary research center at UNC-Chapel Hill, is a leading center for research and policy analysis on the power of financial capital to transform households and communities in the United States. Learn more at Community Capital internships.

EVENTS & MEETINGS

2/13 – Embody Carolina Training

Embody Carolina educates Tar Heels on how to identify and support someone with an eating disorder. The organization is hosting its February training at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 13. Register at Embody Carolina.

2/13 – Screening and panel discussion of “13th”

The Sonja Haynes Stones Center for Black Culture and History is hosting a screening of “13th,” Ava DuVernay’s critically acclaimed documentary on incarceration and racial inequality, 6 p.m. Feb. 13 in the Stone Center Auditorium. A post-screening discussion panel featuring experts from the Triangle area will follow. This event is free for all to attend. See the flier for more information.

2/19 – RESCHEDULED UNC MLK LECTURE AND AWARD CEREMONY

The 37th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Keynote Lecture and Award Ceremony with former Attorney General Loretta Lynch has been rescheduled for 6 p.m., Monday, Feb. 19 in Memorial Hall. All previous ticket arrangements will be honored. Tickets are free, but due to limited space, reservations are required through Carolina Performing Arts. For details on this and other UNC MLK celebration activities, visit the University Office for Diversity and inclusion.

2/21 – Annual African-American history month lecture

The Dr. Gerald Horne will deliver the 14th annual African-American History Month Lecture at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center. The lecture, “Why Black Lives Do Not Matter: Rethinking the Origins of the USA” will be shown at 7 p.m. Feb. 21 in the Stone Center’s Hitchcock room. Visit the Stone Center for more information.

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

3/24 – COMMUNITY EGG HUNT

Volunteers are needed for the town of Chapel Hill’s Community Egg Hunt 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., Saturday, March 24 at the Southern Community Park. Volunteers will help with set up and guiding children and parents during this fun, family-friendly event. Sign up using the special events volunteer form.

Volunteer with challah for hunger

Challah for Hunger is a student-run organization that bakes and sells challah and donates the proceeds to Carolina Cupboard. Sign up to bake or sell, or contact Emily Kokush for more information.

Enrich ELL seeks volunteers

Enrich ELL offers free one-on-one English classes to adults in the local community. Volunteers meet 7 – 8 p.m. on Mondays at the Chapel Hill Public Library and Wednesdays at Hargraves Community Center. Carpool is provided and no prior experience is necessary. If interested, email Kaitlyn Lightfoot.

VOLUNTEER WITH TABLE

TABLE, a nonprofit organization that provides healthy, emergency food aid every week to hungry children in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, needs volunteers for its weekend meal backpack program. Volunteers will organize food, make weekend bags and deliver the bags. Volunteers are also needed to help with SnackChef, a program that teaches children nutrition lessons and how to make healthy snacks. To volunteer, contact Julia Baker.

BASEBALL AND VOLLEYBALL COACHES NEEDED

Carrboro Recreation and Parks Department is accepting volunteer coaching applications for baseball and volleyball programs. Coaches organize practices, teach playing skills, prepare the team for games, bring enthusiasm and create a positive environment. Communication with players and their families is also important. Players vary in age from 6 – 10 years old for baseball and 10 – 13 years old for volleyball. To apply, contact Craig Wolfe.

RODEO ON ROSEMARY NEEDS VOLUNTEERS

Volunteers are needed for the town of Chapel Hill’s Rodeo on Rosemary noon – 4 p.m., April 22. Volunteers will help with recycling. Sign up using the special events volunteer form.

CAROLINA CUPBOARD NEEDS BASKETBALL VOLUNTEERS

Carolina Cupboard’s Community Food Pantry is the on-campus food pantry serving the UNC community. Volunteers are needed during the UNC basketball home games to work as a bag checker, ticket scanner or clean-up crew member. All volunteers will receive a food and drink voucher. To sign up, visit Carolina Cupboard’s Google sheet.

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CCPS WEBSITE – FIND US ON THE WEB

The Carolina Center for Public Service (wccps.unc.edu) features the latest information about the APPLES Service-LearningBuckley Public Service Scholars, and Faculty Engaged Scholars programs as well as details about Public Service Awards and Fellowships. You can also read stories of Carolina students, faculty and staff who are making a difference. The Carolina Center for Public Service: Connecting Carolina and Communities – be sure to bookmark the site. Learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement. Visit us online, follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us today on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill.

UNC’S DISASTER RESPONSE

Whenever disasters strike – in North Carolina, the United States or around the world – Carolina students, faculty and staff immediately ask, “What can we do to help?” If you are aware of disaster response or recovery efforts being coordinated on campus that you would like listed on this page, send an email to CCPS.

ABOUT OUR NEWSLETTER

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more info on CCPS, please visit http://ccps.unc.edu. If you are involved in public service and would like to post an announcement, fill out our online request at http://ccps.unc.edu/news-events/public-service-news-listserv/next-weeks-listserv/. The deadline for inclusion is 5 p.m. on the Wednesday prior to Monday publication. The Public Service News is published only when class is in session, once per week during the academic year and bi-weekly during the summer sessions. To unsubscribe, click here or, send a blank email to leave-34847996-76489955.07b7484471051a00b41b3bf1990b60eb@listserv.unc.edu. Thank you.

Back to top

Public Service News 1/29/2018

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more information on CCPS, visit us online at ccps.unc.edu/. Follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill to learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

OPPORTUNITIES AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

1/31 – Buckley Public Service Scholars spring enrollment deadline
2/5 – Apply to be a Community Engagement Fellow
2/6 – Outward Bound scholarships 
2/7 – Ned Brooks Award
2/7 – Office of the Provost Awards
2/7 – Robert E. Bryan Awards
2/8 – Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award
2/8 – Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship
3/12 – Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars call for applications

UNC DISASTER RELIEF

Disaster relief trips

INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

3/5 – Southern Education Leadership Initiative
3/18 – Democracy Summer internship
Center for Community Capital internship

EVENTS & MEETINGS

2/1 – Red Cross Biomedical Transportation open house
2/19 – Rescheduled UNC MLK lecture and award ceremony
UNC Food for All campus-wide food drive

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

1/31 – Carolina Navigators service-learning experience
3/24 – Community Egg Hunt
Volunteer with TABLE
Baseball, volleyball and field hockey coaches needed
Rodeo on Rosemary needs volunteers
Carolina Cupboard needs basketball volunteers

OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

 1/31 – BUCKLEY PUBLIC SERVICE SCHOLARS SPRING ENROLLMENT deadline

Spring enrollment for the Buckley Public Service Scholars program will close Jan. 31. All undergraduate students with at least four semesters remaining at Carolina can enroll in the Buckley Public Service Scholars program during the enrollment period. Transfer students must have three semesters remaining to enroll. When enrolling, students should sign up for an orientation session or make sure that they will be available for an orientation session the following semester. Enroll online through the Buckley Portfolio. For questions, contact bpss@unc.edu.

2/5 – APPLY TO BE A COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT FELLOW

The Community Engagement Fellowship program awards a maximum of seven fellowships of up to $2,000 each year to develop and implement engagement or engaged scholarship projects that employ innovative, sustainable approaches to complex social needs and have an academic connection. Returning, full-time graduate students at UNC-Chapel Hill are eligible to apply. Previous fellows are eligible to apply for an additional year of funding. To apply, submit a project proposal, sustainability plan, budget, applicant resume(s), a letter of endorsement from a faculty mentor and second letter from a community partner by Feb. 5 through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal.

2/6 – OUTWARD BOUND SCHOLARSHIPS

The Carolina Center for Public Service awards Outward Bound scholarships for undergraduate students at UNC-CH to participate in a 28-day course over the summer through North Carolina Outward Bound School (NCOBS). Recipients receive full tuition for the NCOBS course and Wilderness First Aid certification through its completion. Apply by Feb. 6 through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal.

2/7 – NED BROOKS AWARD

The Ned Brooks Award for Public Service honors the contributions and values of Ned Brooks, who has served the University since 1972, making significant contributions to the mission of service and engagement. The award recognizes a staff or faculty member of the UNC-Chapel Hill community who throughout his/her career has, in a collaborative and sustained manner, made a difference in the larger community. Full nominations are due by 11:59 p.m. Feb. 7, 2018. Online nominations will be accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/7 – OFFICE OF THE PROVOST AWARDS

Nominations are being accepted for the Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Awards. Three Provost awards are given, one each for engaged teaching, engaged research and engaged partnership. The award requires a brief two-paragraph nomination submitted by Feb. 7. Selected nominees will be invited to complete a more detailed submission about their work by Feb. 28. Final selection will be based on both the initial nomination and the nominee application. Nominations are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/7 – ROBERT E. BRYAN AWARDS

Nominations are being accepted for the Robert E. Bryan Public Service Awards. Five Bryan Awards will be given for a specific effort (rather than an overall record) exemplifying outstanding engagement and service to the state of North Carolina. Bryan awards will be given to recognize an outstanding undergraduate student, graduate student, faculty member, staff member and officially recognized student organization. The award requires a brief (two-paragraph) nomination submitted by Feb. 7. Selected nominees will be invited to complete a more detailed submission about their work by Feb. 28. Final selection will be based on both the initial nomination and the nominee application. Nominations are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/8 – RONALD W. HYATT ROTARY PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD

Applications are being accepted for the Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award. Two awards will be given, one (up to $3,000) for an international project and one (up to $2,000) for a local project. If the local project involves members of the Chapel Hill Rotary Club in some way, there is a possibility of additional funds. Undergraduate or graduate students at the UNC-Chapel Hill are eligible to apply, individually or in teams. Applicants must be continuing their studies at UNC-Chapel Hill in the following fall semester. Applications can be submitted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Feb. 8. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/8 – MINGMA NORBU SHERPA FELLOWSHIP

Applications are being accepted for the Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship. Eligible applicants must be an undergraduate or graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill continuing their studies at UNC-Chapel Hill in the semester following their fellowship. Applications are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal until Feb. 8. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

3/12 – THORP FACULTY ENGAGED SCHOLARS CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

The Carolina Center for Public Service is accepting applications for Class VII of the Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars program (FES). FES brings together selected Carolina faculty from across campus to engage in a two-year experiential, competency-based curriculum designed to advance their engaged scholarship. Up to 10 faculty members are selected every other year. The program is highly interactive and experiential, involving field visits, exposure to ongoing projects, and discussions with community and faculty partners. Applications are accepted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Monday, March 12. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

UNC DISASTER RELIEF

DISASTER RELIEF TRIPS

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill continues to be responsive to communities still dealing with the impact of recent disasters. Spring relief trips will all take place at UNC’s adopted home in Lumberton, North Carolina through the North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church. Hurricane Matthew relief day trips will be Feb. 24 (hosted by APPLES Service-Learning), March 2 and April 20. All trips will leave from Memorial Hall at 7:15 a.m. and return to campus no later than 6:30 p.m. Breakfast, lunch, snacks and transportation will be provided. There are no required skills needed to volunteer, but please let us know if you have specific skills, experiences or tools that will be helpful on the work site. Visit UNC disaster relief trips for information about past trips and more details about these experiences. UNC’s disaster relief website is updated with ongoing efforts for Hurricane Matthew and other disasters. Email ccps@unc.edu with questions.

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INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

3/5 – Southern Education Leadership Initiative

The Southern Education Foundation is accepting applications for its Southern Education Leadership Initiative (SELI). SELI provides highly motivated and diverse upperclassmen and graduate students opportunities to develop as leaders, engage with valuable community stakeholders, acquire practical job skills and learn about contemporary education issues. Students spend the summer in trainings and working at an assigned leading nonprofit sector organization. During this experiential learning opportunity, they examine strategies for improving education, addressing community needs and putting theory into practice. Application deadline is March 5.

3/18 – DEMOCRACY SUMMER INTERNSHIP

Democracy Summer is an internship program that exposes young leaders to new ideas and political movements, teaching them how to organize people around a shared vision for a better democracy in our state. Every summer, Democracy NC, a nonpartisan organization that seeks to increase voter participation, hires undergraduate students to work as paid student organizers for nine weeks under the guidance of an experienced Democracy NC organizer. Students work in organizing teams of two in Charlotte, Fayetteville, Greenville, Winston-Salem and Asheville. Student organizers work full time (including some evenings and weekends) from late May to late July and earn a $3,000 stipend. Apply by March 18.

Center for Community Capital internship

The Center for Community Capital seeks a graphic design intern and communication interns for spring 2018. The Center for Community Capital, a non-partisan, multi-disciplinary research center at UNC-Chapel Hill, is a leading center for research and policy analysis on the power of financial capital to transform households and communities in the United States. Learn more at Community Capital internships.

EVENTS & MEETINGS

2/1 – Red Cross Biomedical Transportation open house

The American Red Cross is hosting an informal open house about its Biomedical Transportation program 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Feb. 1 in Durham at 4737 University Drive. Volunteers are needed to assist with the Biomedical Transportation program by transporting boxes of blood to area hospitals using Red Cross vehicles. Flexible shifts are available on weekdays. Learn more at the American Red Cross.

2/19 – Rescheduled UNC MLK lecture and award ceremony

The 37th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Keynote Lecture and Award Ceremony with former Attorney General Loretta Lynch has been rescheduled for 6 p.m., Monday, Feb. 19 in Memorial Hall. All previous ticket arrangements will be honored. Tickets are free, but due to limited space, reservations are required through Carolina Performing Arts. For details on this and other UNC MLK celebration activities, visit the University Office for Diversity and inclusion.

UNC FOOD FOR ALL CAMPUS-WIDE FOOD DRIVE

UNC’s Employee Forum is hosting its Food For All campus-wide, year-long food drive to benefit the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina, and Carolina Cupboard. This drive also contributes to Harris Teeter’s Million Meals Challenge. Donation booths will be set up at several special events and bins will be placed in strategic locations on campus. Donations will be accepted through March 9.

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

1/31 – Carolina Navigators service-learning experience

Carolina Navigators is a selective academic service-learning program at UNC. Throughout the semester, students learn about global education and increase their intercultural knowledge by creating global education resources for students and educators in North Carolina. Apply by Jan. 31 through the Carolina Navigators Google doc.

3/24 – Community Egg Hunt

Volunteers are needed for the town of Chapel Hill’s Community Egg Hunt 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., Saturday, March 24 at the Southern Community Park. Volunteers will help with set up and guiding children and parents during this fun, family-friendly event. Sign up using the special events volunteer form.

Volunteer with TABLE

TABLE, a nonprofit organization that provides healthy, emergency food aid every week to hungry children in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, needs volunteers for its weekend meal backpack program. Volunteers will organize food, make weekend bags and deliver the bags. Volunteers are also needed to help with SnackChef, a program that teaches children nutrition lessons and how to make healthy snacks. To volunteer, contact Julia Baker.

Baseball and volleyball coaches needed

Carrboro Recreation and Parks Department is accepting volunteer coaching applications for baseball and volleyball programs. Coaches organize practices, teach playing skills, prepare the team for games, bring enthusiasm and create a positive environment. Communication with players and their families is also important. Players vary in age from 6 – 10 years old for baseball and 10 – 13 years old for volleyball. To apply, contact Craig Wolfe.

Rodeo on Rosemary needs volunteers

Volunteers are needed for the town of Chapel Hill’s Rodeo on Rosemary noon – 4 p.m., April 22. Volunteers will help with recycling. Sign up using the special events volunteer form.

Carolina Cupboard needs basketball volunteers

Carolina Cupboard’s Community Food Pantry is the on-campus food pantry serving the UNC community. Volunteers are needed during the UNC basketball home games to work as a bag checker, ticket scanner or clean-up crew member. All volunteers will receive a food and drink voucher. To sign up, visit Carolina Cupboard’s Google sheet.

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CCPS WEBSITE – FIND US ON THE WEB

The Carolina Center for Public Service (wccps.unc.edu) features the latest information about the APPLES Service-LearningBuckley Public Service Scholars, and Faculty Engaged Scholars programs as well as details about Public Service Awards and Fellowships. You can also read stories of Carolina students, faculty and staff who are making a difference. The Carolina Center for Public Service: Connecting Carolina and Communities – be sure to bookmark the site. Learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement. Visit us online, follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us today on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill.

UNC’S DISASTER RESPONSE

Whenever disasters strike – in North Carolina, the United States or around the world – Carolina students, faculty and staff immediately ask, “What can we do to help?” If you are aware of disaster response or recovery efforts being coordinated on campus that you would like listed on this page, send an email to CCPS.

ABOUT OUR NEWSLETTER

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more info on CCPS, please visit http://ccps.unc.edu. If you are involved in public service and would like to post an announcement, fill out our online request at http://ccps.unc.edu/news-events/public-service-news-listserv/next-weeks-listserv/. The deadline for inclusion is 5 p.m. on the Wednesday prior to Monday publication. The Public Service News is published only when class is in session, once per week during the academic year and bi-weekly during the summer sessions. To unsubscribe, click here or, send a blank email to leave-34847996-76489955.07b7484471051a00b41b3bf1990b60eb@listserv.unc.edu. Thank you.

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Public Service News 1/22/2018

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more information on CCPS, visit us online at ccps.unc.edu/. Follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill to learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

OPPORTUNITIES AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

1/22 – Deadline to apply for Davis Projects for Peace Award
1/24 – Deadline to apply for APPLES Service-Learning summer internship
1/31 – Buckley Public Service Scholars spring enrollment
2/5 – Apply to be a Community Engagement Fellow
2/6 – Outward Bound scholarships 
2/7 – Ned Brooks Award
2/7 – Office of the Provost Awards
2/7 – Robert E. Bryan Awards
2/8 – Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award
2/8 – Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship
3/12 – Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars call for applications

UNC DISASTER RELIEF

Disaster relief trips

INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

3/5 – Southern Education Leadership Initiative
3/18 – Democracy Summer internship

EVENTS & MEETINGS

1/24 – Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity interest meeting
1/24 – Bone marrow donation/registry interest meeting
UNC Food for All campus-wide food drive

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

1/23 & 24 – Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools volunteer recruitment
1/24 – Hillel’s NYC alternative spring break trip
1/24 – Poverty Simulation volunteers needed
SOAR literacy tutors needed
Volunteer teaching assistants needed

OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

1/22 – Deadline to apply for DAVIS PROJECTS FOR PEACE AWARD

The Davis Projects for Peace Award is open to all undergraduates at the 76 institutions (including UNC-Chapel Hill) that are part of the Davis United World College Scholars Program. Students are invited to design grassroots projects that they will implement during the summer. Davis Projects for Peace selects 100 projects judged to be the most promising and feasible and funds them at $10,000 each. Apply online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Jan. 24.

1/24 – APPLES SERVICE-LEARNING SUMMER INTERNSHIP APPLICATIONS

APPLES Service-Learning is accepting applications for its summer internship program. Students intern at a variety of nonprofit and government organizations, receive a $2,500 stipend, and earn one hour of academic credit through the School of Social Work. Partial, need-based financial assistance is available to selected interns who qualify. Students are responsible for summer housing and travel arrangements unless otherwise noted. Apply through the APPLES Partner Portal by Jan. 24. For questions, contact APPLES Service-Learning.

1/31 – BUCKLEY PUBLIC SERVICE SCHOLARS SPRING ENROLLMENT

Spring enrollment for the Buckley Public Service Scholars program is open until Jan. 31. All undergraduate students with at least four semesters remaining at Carolina can enroll in the Buckley Public Service Scholars program during the enrollment period. Transfer students must have three semesters remaining to enroll. When enrolling, students should sign up for an orientation session or make sure that they will be available for an orientation session the following semester. Enroll online through the Buckley Portfolio. For questions, contact bpss@unc.edu.

2/5 – APPLY TO BE A COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT FELLOW

The Community Engagement Fellowship program awards a maximum of seven fellowships of up to $2,000 each year to develop and implement engagement or engaged scholarship projects that employ innovative, sustainable approaches to complex social needs and have an academic connection. Returning, full-time graduate students at UNC-Chapel Hill are eligible to apply. Previous fellows are eligible to apply for an additional year of funding. To apply, submit a project proposal, sustainability plan, budget, applicant resume(s), a letter of endorsement from a faculty mentor and second letter from a community partner by Feb. 5 through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal.

2/6 – OUTWARD BOUND SCHOLARSHIPS

The Carolina Center for Public Service awards Outward Bound scholarships for undergraduate students at UNC-CH to participate in a 28-day course over the summer through North Carolina Outward Bound School (NCOBS). Recipients receive full tuition for the NCOBS course and Wilderness First Aid certification through its completion. Apply by Feb. 6 through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal.

2/7 – NED BROOKS AWARD

The Ned Brooks Award for Public Service honors the contributions and values of Ned Brooks, who has served the University since 1972, making significant contributions to the mission of service and engagement. The award recognizes a staff or faculty member of the UNC-Chapel Hill community who throughout his/her career has, in a collaborative and sustained manner, made a difference in the larger community. Full nominations are due by 11:59 p.m. Feb. 7, 2018. Online nominations will be accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/7 – OFFICE OF THE PROVOST AWARDS

Nominations are being accepted for the Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Awards. Three Provost awards are given, one each for engaged teaching, engaged research and engaged partnership. The award requires a brief two-paragraph nomination submitted by Feb. 7. Selected nominees will be invited to complete a more detailed submission about their work by Feb. 28. Final selection will be based on both the initial nomination and the nominee application. Nominations are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/7 – ROBERT E. BRYAN AWARDS

Nominations are being accepted for the Robert E. Bryan Public Service Awards. Five Bryan Awards will be given for a specific effort (rather than an overall record) exemplifying outstanding engagement and service to the state of North Carolina. Bryan awards will be given to recognize an outstanding undergraduate student, graduate student, faculty member, staff member and officially recognized student organization. The award requires a brief (two-paragraph) nomination submitted by Feb. 7. Selected nominees will be invited to complete a more detailed submission about their work by Feb. 28. Final selection will be based on both the initial nomination and the nominee application. Nominations are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/8 – RONALD W. HYATT ROTARY PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD

Applications are being accepted for the Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award. Two awards will be given, one (up to $3,000) for an international project and one (up to $2,000) for a local project. If the local project involves members of the Chapel Hill Rotary Club in some way, there is a possibility of additional funds. Undergraduate or graduate students at the UNC-Chapel Hill are eligible to apply, individually or in teams. Applicants must be continuing their studies at UNC-Chapel Hill in the following fall semester. Applications can be submitted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Feb. 8. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/8 – MINGMA NORBU SHERPA FELLOWSHIP

Applications are being accepted for the Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship. Eligible applicants must be an undergraduate or graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill continuing their studies at UNC-Chapel Hill in the semester following their fellowship. Applications are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal until Feb. 8. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

3/12 – THORP FACULTY ENGAGED SCHOLARS CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

The Carolina Center for Public Service is accepting applications for Class VII of the Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars program (FES). FES brings together selected Carolina faculty from across campus to engage in a two-year experiential, competency-based curriculum designed to advance their engaged scholarship. Up to 10 faculty members are selected every other year. The program is highly interactive and experiential, involving field visits, exposure to ongoing projects, and discussions with community and faculty partners. Applications are accepted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Monday, March 12. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

UNC DISASTER RELIEF

DISASTER RELIEF TRIPs

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill continues to be responsive to communities still dealing with the impact of recent disasters. Spring relief trips will all take place at UNC’s adopted home in Lumberton, North Carolina through the North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church. Hurricane Matthew relief day trips will be Jan. 26 (hosted by APPLES Service-Learning), March 2 and April 20. All trips will leave from Memorial Hall at 7:15 a.m. and return to campus no later than 6:30 p.m. Breakfast, lunch, snacks and transportation will be provided. There are no required skills needed to volunteer, but please let us know if you have specific skills, experiences or tools that will be helpful on the work site. Visit UNC disaster relief trips for information about past trips and more details about these experiences. UNC’s disaster relief website is updated with ongoing efforts for Hurricane Matthew and other disasters. Email ccps@unc.edu with questions.

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INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

3/5 – Southern Education Leadership Initiative

.The Southern Education Foundation is accepting applications for its Southern Education Leadership Initiative (SELI). SELI provides highly motivated and diverse upperclassmen and graduate students opportunities to develop as leaders, engage with valuable community stakeholders, acquire practical job skills and learn about contemporary education issues. Students spend the summer in trainings and working at an assigned leading nonprofit sector organization. During this experiential learning opportunity, they examine strategies for improving education, addressing community needs and putting theory into practice. Application deadline is March 5.

3/18 – Democracy Summer internship

Democracy Summer is an internship program that exposes young leaders to new ideas and political movements, teaching them how to organize people around a shared vision for a better democracy in our state. Every summer, Democracy NC, a nonpartisan organization that seeks to increase voter participation, hires undergraduate students to work as paid student organizers for nine weeks under the guidance of an experienced Democracy NC organizer. Students work in organizing teams of two in Charlotte, Fayetteville, Greenville, Winston-Salem and Asheville. Student organizers work full time (including some evenings and weekends) from late May to late July and earn a $3,000 stipend. Apply by March 18.

EVENTS & MEETINGS

1/24 – Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity interest meeting

Alpha Phi Omega, the largest coed service fraternity in the nation, has core values that include leadership, friendship and service. If you have at least three remaining semesters at UNC, join us at an interest meeting. Sessions are 9 p.m., Jan. 24 in the Student Union, room 3209; and 8 p.m., Jan. 26 in the Student Union, room 2423. For more information, contact Olivia Huckel.

1/24 – BONE MARROW DONATION/REGISTRY INTEREST MEETING

Learn more about Be the Match bone marrow donation and registry 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Jan. 24 at the UNC Blood Donation Center at the N.C. Cancer Hospital. The session will debunk fears about bone marrow transplants and participants can be swabbed to join the bone marrow registry. To make a platelet donation appointment, visit UNC Health Care Blood Donation Center or email platelet@unchealth.unc.edu.

World.

UNC FOOD FOR ALL CAMPUS-WIDE FOOD DRIVE

UNC’s Employee Forum is hosting its Food For All campus-wide, year-long food drive to benefit the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina, and Carolina Cupboard. This drive also contributes to Harris Teeter’s Million Meals Challenge. Donation booths will be set up at several special events and bins will be placed in strategic locations on campus. Donations will be accepted through March 9.

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

1/23 & 24 – Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools volunteer recruitment

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools (CHCCS) will be on the UNC campus to recruit volunteers 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Jan. 23 and 24 in the Student Union, room 3102. CHCCS staff will answer questions about volunteer opportunities and those interested can receive a placement and complete all paperwork that day to start volunteering sooner.

1/24 – Hillel’s NYC alternative spring break trip

North Carolina Hillel UNC-Chapel Hill will offer an intensive seminar March 11 – 18 that explores education justice, food justice, and racial justice learning and service in New York City. The cost is $200 and includes housing, most meals, on-the-ground transportation and program costs. Visit Hillel’s alternative spring break for details.

1/24 – Poverty Simulation volunteers needed

Volunteers are needed to participate in a poverty simulation 1 – 4 p.m., Jan. 24 at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center. Poverty Simulation provides people from all backgrounds an opportunity to walk in the shoes of a low-income family and be exposed to the realities of poverty. Participants receive an assigned identity and family profile. They are provided the opportunity to experience one month of poverty compressed into real time of the simulation. Afterward, participants will debrief and share insights of their experience. Participants will encounter some unique circumstances that may cause them to think differently about poverty. The simulation is free, however registration is required. Lunch and a break will be provided. Participants must be willing to stay for the entire simulation.

SOAR literacy tutors needed

SOAR seeks volunteers to tutor children one-on-one twice a week for a 45-minute session between 3 – 5 p.m. SOAR serves second-graders at North Chatham Elementary School in Chapel Hill and first-graders at Virginia Cross Elementary in Siler City. The students served have been identified as not meeting the North Carolina literacy benchmarks. A free five-day training is provided. Sign up through SOAR’s Google Form or call 919-533-9037.

Volunteer teaching assistants needed

Each year, The Power of the Dream holds a weekend class series to teach unemployed and underemployed adults with autism/IDD how to create their own very small business or micro-enterprise. Volunteers are needed to assist the class. No knowledge of disability or business is required, just the willingness to learn and help others. For more information and to sign up, see the online registration form.

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CCPS WEBSITE – FIND US ON THE WEB

The Carolina Center for Public Service (wccps.unc.edu) features the latest information about the APPLES Service-LearningBuckley Public Service Scholars, and Faculty Engaged Scholars programs as well as details about Public Service Awards and Fellowships. You can also read stories of Carolina students, faculty and staff who are making a difference. The Carolina Center for Public Service: Connecting Carolina and Communities – be sure to bookmark the site. Learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement. Visit us online, follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us today on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill.

UNC’S DISASTER RESPONSE

Whenever disasters strike – in North Carolina, the United States or around the world – Carolina students, faculty and staff immediately ask, “What can we do to help?” If you are aware of disaster response or recovery efforts being coordinated on campus that you would like listed on this page, send an email to CCPS.

ABOUT OUR NEWSLETTER

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more info on CCPS, please visit http://ccps.unc.edu. If you are involved in public service and would like to post an announcement, fill out our online request at http://ccps.unc.edu/news-events/public-service-news-listserv/next-weeks-listserv/. The deadline for inclusion is 5 p.m. on the Wednesday prior to Monday publication. The Public Service News is published only when class is in session, once per week during the academic year and bi-weekly during the summer sessions. To unsubscribe, click here or, send a blank email to leave-34847996-76489955.07b7484471051a00b41b3bf1990b60eb@listserv.unc.edu. Thank you.

Back to top

Public Service News 1/8/2018

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more information on CCPS, visit us online at ccps.unc.edu/. Follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill to learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

OPPORTUNITIES AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

1/20 – Davis Projects for Peace Award
1/24 – APPLES Service-Learning summer internship applications
1/31 – Buckley Public Service Scholars spring enrollment
2/5 – Apply to be a Community Engagement Fellow
2/6 – Outward Bound scholarships
2/7 – Ned Brooks Award
2/7 – Office of the Provost Awards
2/7 – Robert E. Bryan Awards
2/8 – Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award
2/8 – Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship
3/12 – Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars call for applications

INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

1/17 – Carolina Navigators spring service-learning experience
2/22 – Breakthrough Collaborative

EVENTS & MEETINGS

1/15 – UNC-MLK 5K
1/18- UNC MLK lecture and award ceremony

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

1/10 – Help children with disabilities learn to swim
United Way day of service project opportunities
1/10/18 – Help children with disabilities learn to swim
Join Enrich ELL
Rainbow Soccer needs spring coaches
Alternative spring break opportunity
Spring baseball and volleyball coaches needed

OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

1/20 – DAVIS PROJECTS FOR PEACE AWARD

The Davis Projects for Peace Award is open to all undergraduates at the 76 institutions (including UNC-Chapel Hill) that are part of the Davis United World College Scholars Program. Students are invited to design grassroots projects that they will implement during the summer. Davis Projects for Peace selects 100 projects judged to be the most promising and feasible and funds them at $10,000 each. Apply online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Jan. 20.

1/24 – APPLES Service-Learning summer internship applications

APPLES Service-Learning is accepting applications for its summer internship program. Students intern at a variety of nonprofit and government organizations, receive a $2,500 stipend, and earn one hour of academic credit through the School of Social Work. Partial, need-based financial assistance is available to selected interns who qualify. Students are responsible for summer housing and travel arrangements unless otherwise noted. Apply through the APPLES Partner Portal by Jan. 26. For questions, contact APPLES Service-Learning.

1/31 – Buckley Public Service Scholars spring enrollment

Spring enrollment for the Buckley Public Service Scholars program is open until Jan. 31. All undergraduate students with at least four semesters remaining at Carolina can enroll in the Buckley Public Service Scholars program during the enrollment period. Transfer students must have three semesters remaining to enroll. When enrolling, students should sign up for an orientation session or make sure that they will be available for an orientation session the following semester. Enroll online through the Buckley Portfolio. For questions, contact bpss@unc.edu.

2/5 – Apply to be a Community Engagement Fellow

The Community Engagement Fellowship program awards a maximum of seven fellowships of up to $2,000 each year to develop and implement engagement or engaged scholarship projects that employ innovative, sustainable approaches to complex social needs and have an academic connection. Returning, full-time graduate students at UNC-Chapel Hill are eligible to apply. Previous fellows are eligible to apply for an additional year of funding. To apply, submit a project proposal, sustainability plan, budget, applicant resume(s), a letter of endorsement from a faculty mentor and second letter from a community partner by Feb. 5 through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal.

2/6 – Outward Bound scholarships

The Carolina Center for Public Service awards Outward Bound scholarships for undergraduate students at UNC-CH to participate in a 28-day course over the summer through North Carolina Outward Bound School (NCOBS). Recipients receive full tuition for the NCOBS course and Wilderness First Aid certification through its completion. Apply by Feb. 6 through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal.

2/7 – Ned Brooks Award

The Ned Brooks Award for Public Service honors the contributions and values of Ned Brooks, who has served the University since 1972, making significant contributions to the mission of service and engagement. The award recognizes a staff or faculty member of the UNC-Chapel Hill community who throughout his/her career has, in a collaborative and sustained manner, made a difference in the larger community. Full nominations are due by 11:59 p.m. Feb. 7, 2018. Online nominations will be accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/7 – Office of the Provost Awards

Nominations are being accepted for the Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Awards. Three Provost awards are given, one each for engaged teaching, engaged research and engaged partnership. The award requires a brief two-paragraph nomination submitted by Feb. 7. Selected nominees will be invited to complete a more detailed submission about their work by Feb. 28. Final selection will be based on both the initial nomination and the nominee application. Nominations are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/7 – Robert E. Bryan Awards

Nominations are being accepted for the Robert E. Bryan Public Service Awards. Five Bryan Awards will be given for a specific effort (rather than an overall record) exemplifying outstanding engagement and service to the state of North Carolina. Bryan awards will be given to recognize an outstanding undergraduate student, graduate student, faculty member, staff member and officially recognized student organization. The award requires a brief (two-paragraph) nomination submitted by Feb. 7. Selected nominees will be invited to complete a more detailed submission about their work by Feb. 28. Final selection will be based on both the initial nomination and the nominee application. Nominations are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/8 – Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award

Applications are being accepted for the Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Award. Two awards will be given, one (up to $3,000) for an international project and one (up to $2,000) for a local project. If the local project involves members of the Chapel Hill Rotary Club in some way, there is a possibility of additional funds. Undergraduate or graduate students at the UNC-Chapel Hill are eligible to apply, individually or in teams. Applicants must be continuing their studies at UNC-Chapel Hill in the following fall semester. Applications can be submitted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Feb. 8. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

2/8 – Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship

Applications are being accepted for the Mingma Norbu Sherpa Fellowship. Eligible applicants must be an undergraduate or graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill continuing their studies at UNC-Chapel Hill in the semester following their fellowship. Applications are accepted through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal until Feb. 8. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

3/12 – Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars call for applications

The Carolina Center for Public Service is accepting applications for Class VII of the Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholars program (FES). FES brings together selected Carolina faculty from across campus to engage in a two-year experiential, competency-based curriculum designed to advance their engaged scholarship. Up to 10 faculty members are selected every other year. The program is highly interactive and experiential, involving field visits, exposure to ongoing projects, and discussions with community and faculty partners. Applications are accepted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application and Nomination Portal by Monday, March 12. For questions, email ccps@unc.edu.

INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

1/17 – Carolina Navigators spring service-learning experience

Carolina Navigators is a highly selective academic, undergraduate service-learning program at UNC. Throughout the semester, students learn about global education and increase their own intercultural competence, both online and in face-to-face meetings by creating global education resources for K – 14 students and educators in North Carolina. Apply by Jan. 17.

2/22 – Breakthrough Collaborative

Are you interested in education, teaching and leadership? Consider applying to Breakthrough Collaborative. Breakthrough tackles the opportunity gap with middle-school students across the country. Through nine-week summer residencies, fellows gain more than 100 hours of leadership and teaching training. Fellows receive a living stipend and housing may be available for its 25 programs in cities across the country and in Hong Kong. The summer 2018 application deadline is Feb. 22.

EVENTS & MEETINGS

1/15 – UNC-MLK 5K

Carolina R.O.C.T.S. (Rejuvenating Our Community Through Service) will sponsor its 15th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service 5K run Monday, Jan. 15. Registration begins at 6 a.m. and the run begins at 7 a.m. Proceeds benefit Girls on the Rum of the Triangle and UNC’s Healthy Girls Save the World.

1/18 – UNC MLK lecture and award ceremony

UNC will host its 37th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Keynote Lecture and Award Ceremony at 7 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 18 in Memorial Hall. United States Attorney General Loretta Lynch will deliver the lecture. Tickets are free, but due to limited space, reservations are required through Carolina Performing Arts. For details on this and other UNC MLK celebration activities, visit the University Office for Diversity and inclusion.

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

1/10 – Help children with disabilities learn to swim

The Chapel Hill Parks and Recreation: Adapted Recreation department needs volunteers to work one-on-one with students with disabilities, ages 5 – 22 years old, during swim practice. Classes are 6:30 – 8:15 p.m. on Wednesdays from Jan. 10 – Feb. 7. For more information, contact Marian Kaslovsky.

United Way day of service project opportunities

Each year, United Way of the Greater Triangle hosts more than 2,000 volunteers for more than 35 projects across the four counties during its Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service. Projects range from packing meals to landscaping to one-on-one reading with students. New partners have been added this year, as well as opportunities to volunteer during the weekend before MLK Day. A full list of volunteer projects are available on a first come, first basis.

Volunteer teaching assistants needed

Each year, The Power of the Dream holds a weekend class series to teach un(der)employed adults with autism/IDD how to create their own very small business, or micro-enterprise. Dedicated volunteers are needed to assist. No knowledge of disability or business is required, just the willingness to learn and help others. For more information and to sign up, see the online registration form.

Join Enrich ELL

Are you Interested in teaching English? Join Enrich ELL. Enrich offers free one-on-one English classes to adults in the local community. Volunteers meet 7 – 8 p.m. Mondays at the Chapel Hill Public Library and Wednesdays at Hargraves Community Center. Carpool is provided. If interested, visit Enrich ELL or email enrichenglishunc@gmail.com to get involved. No experience required.

RAINBOW SOCCER NEEDS SPRING COACHES

Rainbow Soccer is recruiting coaches for co-ed and all-girls teams. The spring season runs from March 19 – May 12, and players range from 3 – 15 years old. Teams meet once or twice during the week, and games are held on the weekend. Soccer knowledge and previous experience working with youth is helpful but not required, and you can coach with a friend. Contact Karen Aldridge for more info.

Alternative spring break opportunity

Every year Appalachia Service Project at UNC offers an alternative spring break trip into central Appalachia. We have 14 spots left to fill and are looking for students that would like to spend a week immersing themselves in Appalachian culture and providing critical home repair to a family in need. No construction experience required! All-inclusive cost of $200, scholarships available. Contact asp.unc@gmail.com for more information.

Spring baseball and volleyball coaches needed

Carrboro Recreation and Parks Department is accepting volunteer coaching applications for the spring baseball and volleyball programs. Coaches must organize practices, teach playing skills, prepare the team for games, bring enthusiasm and create a positive environment. Communication with players ages 6 – 10 years old for baseball and 10 – 13 years old for volleyball, parents and recreation department staff is also important. If interested, email Craig Wolfe.

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CCPS WEBSITE – FIND US ON THE WEB

The Carolina Center for Public Service (wccps.unc.edu) features the latest information about the APPLES Service-LearningBuckley Public Service Scholars, and Faculty Engaged Scholars programs as well as details about Public Service Awards and Fellowships. You can also read stories of Carolina students, faculty and staff who are making a difference. The Carolina Center for Public Service: Connecting Carolina and Communities – be sure to bookmark the site. Learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement. Visit us online, follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us today on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill.

UNC’S DISASTER RESPONSE

Whenever disasters strike – in North Carolina, the United States or around the world – Carolina students, faculty and staff immediately ask, “What can we do to help?” If you are aware of disaster response or recovery efforts being coordinated on campus that you would like listed on this page, send an email to CCPS.

ABOUT OUR NEWSLETTER

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more info on CCPS, please visit http://ccps.unc.edu. If you are involved in public service and would like to post an announcement, fill out our online request at http://ccps.unc.edu/news-events/public-service-news-listserv/next-weeks-listserv/. The deadline for inclusion is 5 p.m. on the Wednesday prior to Monday publication. The Public Service News is published only when class is in session, once per week during the academic year and bi-weekly during the summer sessions. To unsubscribe, click here or, send a blank email to leave-34847996-76489955.07b7484471051a00b41b3bf1990b60eb@listserv.unc.edu. Thank you.

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Service experiences lead to dream career for senior Analisa Sorrells

For Analisa Sorrells, a December 2017 graduate from Windermere, Florida, time in service at UNC led her to her dream career path – one of giving back and helping others.

Analisa Sorrells volunteering at TABLE“When I arrived at Carolina, I immediately got involved with Tar Heel TABLE and the Buckley Public Service Scholars (BPSS) program,” Sorrells said. “I was set on studying nutrition. I was fascinated by food and how it impacted our health and our livelihoods. I took an entire first year of prerequisites – anatomy and organic chemistry in all – before a few experiences that completely changed my academic and career course.”

Those experiences were in service.

The summer after her freshman year, Sorrells interned with Feeding Children Everywhere, an Orlando nonprofit that provides healthy meals to those in need. “I learned more about the startling reality of childhood hunger – both domestically and internationally – and about the various nonprofits and organizations working to end it,” Sorrells said.

“When I returned to UNC for my sophomore year, I took on a larger role in Tar Heel TABLE, learning more about hunger that existed right outside my dorm window in Chapel Hill.”

At the same time, Sorrells also enrolled in her first public policy class. “I took the class on a whim and fell in love with the material. For the first time, I learned about more than just the social problems facing our world – but about the possibility we each have to make a positive impact on them through our careers and through service. I changed my major to public policy and never looked back. After taking the APPLES service-learning course on nonprofit consulting and serving as a board member for TABLE, my interest in the nonprofit sector was solidified.”

During her sophomore year, Sorrells also participated in an APPLES Service-Learning alternative winter break where she was introduced to the concept of learning outside of the classroom. She engaged in hands-on service in the Asheville community, meeting with community leaders, local government agencies and nonprofits connected to hunger and homelessness.

“I was able to grasp the issues at hand more deeply than ever before,” Sorrells said. “This experience encouraged me to enroll in APPLES service-learning courses and continue pursuing skills trainings through BPSS, as they completed my undergraduate experience in a way that traditional coursework never could.”

During the summer of 2017, Sorrells partnered with EducationNC through the Jamie Kirk Hahn Foundation Fellowship. She worked on the early childhood team and learned more about the importance of early childhood education, nonprofit management and social justice. Her project with EducationNC combined her interests in education and nutrition, allowing her to study and report on summer meal programs in North Carolina.

After her fellowship, EducationNC offered Sorrells a position as a reporter and executive fellow for the spring of 2018. Now with more than 300 service hours under her belt through BPSS, APPLES and TABLE, Sorrells said that this position is a perfect fit for her interests.

“It allows me to work in a nonprofit organization that I believe is striving to make North Carolina a better place for all,” she said. “I will travel across the state and meet with various leaders and change-makers, as well as report on pressing issues in education and public health. I look forward to taking the lessons I’ve learned inside and outside of the classroom at Carolina and put them into action with my role at EducationNC.”

-Carolina-

Photo credit: Rhesa Versola

Carolina Bucket Brigade

By Davis McKinney

Students in the pit filling buckets wtih clearning supplies at the Carolina Bucket Brigade.By definition, a bucket brigade is a chain of persons acting to put out a fire by passing buckets of water from hand to hand. On Friday, Nov. 10, more than 100 students and student-athletes responded to the call to aid those affected by recent hurricanes by participating in the first-ever Carolina Bucket Brigade. Students packed nearly 200 buckets with cleaning supplies to support relief efforts for disaster-affected areas like Puerto Rico, Texas, Florida and Mexico.

Both in the Pit and the Loudermilk Center for Excellence, students made their way down an assembly line, gathering cleaning supplies including dish soap, rubber gloves, air freshener, sponges and other much-needed items. The result was nearly 200 assembled buckets, which will be donated to the North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church and shipped to the areas in need.

“I loved assembling a bucket. It was so easy and it’ll help a lot of people,” said Sarah Grace McKinney, a first-year at UNC. “It’s great to know my school is working to help those who need it in so many places devastated by hurricanes.”

Student athletes at Blue Zone bucket brigadeHosted by the Carolina Center for Public Service in partnership with Carolina Athletics, the Carolina Bucket Brigade was one of many campus efforts to aid those still recovering from the recent hurricanes. “Carolina Athletics is thrilled to again partner with the Carolina for Public Service and to contribute to the bucket brigade project,” Korie Rich, assistant director for student-athlete development, said. “We know that people in our state are still recovering from Hurricane Matthew, and our student-athletes are glad to be able to help in any way possible. UNC recently hosted a men’s basketball jamboree to raise funds for disaster relief, and the Carolina Bucket Brigade is another concrete way for us to join with fellow Tar Heels as part of the ongoing relief effort, both in North Carolina and in other areas recently affected by natural disasters.”

The Carolina Bucket Brigade event was made possible through generous donations from Sherwin-Williams stores in Durham and Chapel Hill, as well as the local Home Depot, PPG Paints and numerous Walmart stores.

Though the event is over, donors can still support the University in its response to natural disasters by donating to the UNC Disaster Relief Fund.

APPLES alternative breaks launches new break experience

By Becca Kronebusch

A record number 82 UNC students participated in APPLES Service-Learning Alternative Fall Break, providing direct and indirect service to communities across North Carolina and the southeast. The seven break trips focused on each community’s needs, including Latinx, urban, rural, and refugee communities; environmental issues; hunger and homelessness; and Arts in Public Service.

APPLES alternative fall break participants with refugee communitiesThe refugee community break to Greensboro, North Carolina is the newest addition to the APPLES alternative break program made possible through the Murdock Family Alternative Break Experience Fund. Since October 2016, North Carolina resettled 1,812 refugees, the ninth most in the U.S. Victor Arahirwa, a junior chemistry major from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, served as a refugee community break leader because he has family and close friends who have been refugees or asylum-seekers. He wanted to learn more about the resources available for refugees to integrate into the society they find themselves in.

“Refugees have been the victims of negative, dehumanizing portrayals in the media,” Arahirwa said. “This trip served to re-humanize refugees and show that if given the chance, they can make positive contributions to society, rather than being a burden. In the light of political measures to tighten border control in the U.S. and other countries, having a trip that raises awareness of the realities of being a refugee could not have come at a better time.”

The refugee alternative break experience included volunteer efforts at a community garden with World Relief High Point, educational programs around refugee resettlement, financial security, employment and health care with various partners.

Simran Khadka, a senior environmental health sciences major from Nepal and alternative fall break co-chair, helped establish the refugee trip to help Greensboro’s 11 refugee communities. She said that her mother’s volunteer work inspired her to create the trip.

“My mom used to volunteer with AmeriCorps’ ACCESS project in Greensboro, which helped refugees and immigrants gain access to many services, English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes and life skills,” Khadka said. “I was definitely inspired by her even though she was ESOL individual herself. Even though her service was in 2010-2011, I was curious to know how the refugee demographics have changed over time.”

Khadka researched Greensboro community partners connected to refugee rehabilitation and created a mock trip report which turned into the plan for the new alternative fall break experience in Greensboro.

Students directly addressed the refugee community’s needs by installing water pipes in a community garden that grows local produce and providing after-school tutoring in math and English to refugee children.

Participants also gained a deeper understanding of resources and organizations available to immigrants. They attended a session at the North Carolina African Services Coalition, which assists refugees in finding employment, housing and language support, with the goal of helping them become self-sufficient within 90 days of arrival. In addition, students also talked with Dr. Jeff Walden of the Cone Health Family Medicine Center, who opened a clinic in 2014 to treat refugee patients, and they toured the FaithAction International House, which creates an environment of mutual understanding between immigrants, community members and law enforcement.

APPLES offers alternative breaks during fall, winter and spring breaks. To learn more, visit APPLES Alternative Breaks.

-Carolina-

Water Over the Bridge

By Alyssa LaFaro, Endeavors

From the competitive ports of China, to the innovative flood gates of the Netherlands, to the shifting sands of the Outer Banks, the sea creeps farther up the coastline every single day, and the distance between the top of the water and the bottom of bridges decreases — a major issue for port economies. UNC American studies professor Rachel Willis searches for solutions to help these communities cope with the impact of sea-level rise.

Orange traffic cones surround a fluorescent yellow-garbed construction worker on NC-12. He raises his hand perpendicular to the roadway, signaling to slow down with a weathered red stop sign. As cars speed past in the left-hand lane, enormous cranes on ocean barges lift heavy beams onto a bridge being built alongside the existing one.

Hurricane impact sidebarMore than 14,000 vehicles cross the Herbert C. Bonner Bridge every day — a lifeline for the people of Ocracoke and Hatteras islands, connecting them to the Northern Outer Banks. Below the bridge, tides from the Atlantic Ocean push into the widening Oregon Inlet, breaking through to the Pamlico Sound.

The Bonner Bridge Replacement Project began on March 8, 2016. The new structure is designed to withstand 100 years of ocean currents, built with high-durability concrete and reinforced stainless steel. But it comes after years of failed attempts to create a durable bridge and countless arguments over environmental concerns.

Constant beach erosion, severe weather, and high traffic volumes have regularly compromised the state of this roadway since its completion in 1963. In 1990, in the middle of the night, a state trooper watched a dredge collide with the bridge during a brutal nor’easter, causing 400 feet of roadway to collapse into the waves below. For three-and-a-half months, Hatteras Island could only be accessed by boat or plane. In 2013, safety concerns closed the bridge for 12 days when routine sonar scanning showed that substantial sand erosion had compromised the support structure. And in the summer of 2017, construction crews struck major underground electrical cables, knocking out power to Ocracoke and Hatteras islands for weeks.

Since the bridge’s original construction, more than $300 million has been spent to protect and repair it.

Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar Rachel WillisRachel Willis watches the bridge construction from the water’s edge on Hatteras Island. She sighs.

“The ocean wants to open that inlet,” she says. “But we have put all this development and coastal infrastructure in a fixed place — and nature keeps taking it back. How are we preparing to protect the people in these communities? How can we make them less vulnerable? The answer is not ignoring the signs that nature gives us.”

Willis, a professor of American studies, global studies, economics, and a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar, researches the intersection of transportation infrastructure and sea-level rise.

How does a labor economist end up studying climate change? The answer is not one you’d expect: socks.

Knitting global social fabric

In the early 1990s, Willis and students compiled data from every child care center in North Carolina — research that contributed to the development of Smart Start legislation. In 1994, while presenting this research at a conference, she met a sock manufacturer who would eventually introduce her to Dan St. Louis, an industry specialist who created training programs to help factories better communicate with employees and help workers become better contributors.

Over the next 10 years, Willis followed the lifecycle of socks around the world. She traveled to Italy to learn where the machines were manufactured, to China to understand business practices of the United States’ soon-to-be biggest competitor, and to the Czech Republic to see where all the Soviet Union sock-knitting machines were made. In North Carolina, she visited more than 200 sock factories and interviewed thousands of workers, owners, supervisors, and suppliers, among other people in the industry.

But it wasn’t just about socks.

“A sock is circular knitting — what goes around comes around,” she says. “Following these complex knitting patterns around the world showed how everything is connected. The purpose of this research was, really, to find out the future of manufacturing, which was obviously declining in the United States. It quickly became clear that cost-effective land transportation was vital to global competitiveness.”

By land or by sea?

When you drive into Morehead City, you can follow the train tracks all the way to the port thanks to the city’s namesake John Motley Morehead, who, as governor, oversaw their construction in the 19thcentury. Today, boats still arrive at the port and directly load goods onto the trains, which make deliveries to local factories and villages along the corridor.

But this kind of infrastructure is the exception. “We’ve undervalued trains as a transportation method in this country,” Willis says. “It’s all about the interstate system here.”

Here’s why Willis believes the nation must put goods on railcars and then get railcars to ports: It costs about 80 cents per mile to move one metric ton of freight on an airplane. It costs 27 cents to move it by truck. It costs 2 cents by rail. “It costs one penny by water — and also by pipeline,” Willis stresses. These numbers don’t just represent product cost — they are a proxy for the amount of carbon put into the atmosphere to move goods around the planet.

The search for a solution

Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar Rachel Willis bikingThe Dutch have a famous saying: “God built the world, but the Dutch built Holland.” About one-fifth of the Netherlands lies below sea level and 60 percent is vulnerable to flooding — startling statistics that the Dutch have learned to live with. Unlike most of the world, they have always worked to maintain a symbiotic relationship with the water.

Willis has always been fascinated by Dutch resiliency. And with good reason.

In the 13th century, they were already reclaiming land through the construction of dykes after flooding. Two hundred years later, the invention of the rotating turret windmill not only pumped water out of permanently flooded lands — it provided an energy source. Fast-forward to 1852, when the Dutch government reclaimed the land that is now Amsterdam’s Schipol Airport. They spent the next century taking land back from the sea and, in the 1980s, began the largest land reclamation project and erected the grandest flood barrier that the world has ever seen.

The barrier, called Maeslantkering, is equivalent in size to two Eiffel Towers placed horizontally on the water in the Hook of Holland. In 2015, Willis decided she had to go see it for herself. To get there from Amsterdam, she hopped on a wind-powered train (all Dutch trains are powered by wind) and headed to the Hook of Holland, where she rented a bike to complete the rest of the journey.

“I biked along the road between the shipping canal and the new high-capacity wind turbines that are powering all their trains,” she says. “It was amazing to see how you can take problems like high winds and turn them into solutions.” She also took a tour of the barrier and got to see firsthand the complex interactions of moving freight transportation.

“If you’re looking for an insane field trip, go see where these solutions are in full force,” she advises. Another great example, according to Willis, is the Thames Barrier— which prevents Greater London from high tides and storm surges moving up the North Sea. Stretching 1,700 feet across the Thames, the barrier’s 10 steel gates remain flush with the river floor until a threat of high tide — and then they’re rotated upward, to the height of a five-story building, to block rising waters from entering the city. The whole process takes anywhere from 75 to 90 minutes.

“In 2013 alone, the barrier was used 50 times,” Willis says. Since its completion in 1984, the barrier has raised its gates nearly 180 times.

A wonder of the modern world

Although the Dutch continued to pump water from land in the 20th century, they still encountered problems from flooding. The North Sea Flood of 1953, for example, killed more than 2,000 people and put more than 370,000 acres of land underwater. In response, the government began Delta Works, a series of construction projects involving dams, sluices, locks, dykes, levees, and storm surge barriers to secure and protect the deltas of the southwest Netherlands.

In addition, at Maasvlakte 2, they’ve built ports and shipping facilities on reclaimed land that doesn’t conflict with people living in nearby communities. “The Dutch spend the same percentage of their national income on infrastructure related to water management as the U.S. spends on military,” Willis says. “Because fighting the water is their national defense.”

That’s why Willis headed to the Netherlands again this past summer — to speak with experts in engineering, infrastructure, and regional planning. In recent years, the Dutch have refocused their efforts on engineering with nature to provide coastal protection. In 2011, they used 21 million cubic meters of sand to form a hook-shaped peninsula called the “sand engine,” which enables the forces of the ocean to deposit sand along the North Sea coast.

Willis realizes that these solutions are not financially possible for most of the world’s coastlines including India, Brazil, and even regions of the United States. “The costs are astronomical for all but the wealthiest communities and countries,” she says. “They are simply not in the community’s budget, much less the national or global budget.” The physical resources needed to develop these solutions are also in short global supply, she points out.

Optimism and education

Approximately 50 percent of the world’s population will live within 30 miles of the coast by 2050, according to Willis. What does this mean for neighborhoods, for families that live by the water’s edge? How do we prepare people for threats from more intense storms? Even more importantly, what happens to humans in places that are at-risk now, in places like the Maldives, Vietnam, and the Outer Banks?

“I have great optimism about finding solutions,” Willis says. “Because I’ve seen extraordinary examples of them.” She stresses that working toward solutions involves seeing the whole picture.

“Our goals are not American — our goals are global. That means continuing to travel to see how other countries are adapting to rising sea levels and more frequent flooding. Because the problem is not going away. It’s water over the bridge. These destructive flooding events are going to be more severe and more frequent as time goes on. We have to have a better plan, and our first step is educating people on why we need to move back from the water. We need to look at infrastructure in the short run that is adaptable to these flood waters, but we need to use policy and incentives to stop building at the edge.”

Rachel Willis is a professor of American studies, global studies, and economics within the UNC College of Arts & Sciences. She is a Thorp Faculty Engaged Scholar.

Public Service News 10/23/2017

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more information on CCPS, visit us online at ccps.unc.edu/. Follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill to learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement.

Whenever disasters strike – in North Carolina, the United States or around the world – Carolina students, faculty and staff immediately ask, “What can we do to help?” As the UNC community considers ways to help with the Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma disaster response, details will be shared through the Carolina Center for Public Service and its disaster relief webpage. The North Carolina community continues to help those affected by Hurricane Matthew. For updates on UNC’s efforts, visit Hurricane Matthew disaster relief.

If you are aware of disaster response or recovery efforts being coordinated on campus, or if you are organizing efforts to help, please send an email to CCPS.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

OPPORTUNITIES AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

10/23 – Deadline for Bryan Fellowship applications
11/6 – APPLES Alternative Spring Break applications
11/17 – APPLES community partner summit internship applications
11/27 – Disaster relief trip

INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

10/23 – Social justice project grant funding
10/25 – Pupusas 4 Education internship
11/6 – Jesuit Volunteer Corps recruiting

11/9 – Parents Council grant application

EVENTS & MEETINGS

10/26 – Alternative spring break trip interest meeting
10/27 & 28 – Read.Write.Act virtual conference
11/3 – Earthquake and disaster relief benefit concert
11/4 & 19 – Ecuador earthquake relief trip
11/14 & 15 – UNC Passport Drive

PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

10/23 – 11/7 – Volunteer with Kids Voting Durham
Sign up to be a Dance Marathon dancer
Compass Center seeks spring volunteers

OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE AT THE CAROLINA CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

10/23 – Deadline for BRYAN FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS

APPLES Service-Learning’s Robert E. Bryan Fellowship is designed for undergraduate student teams interested in creating social impact locally and/or globally through the creation of an innovative project that addresses a community-identified need. Applications for 2018 Bryan Fellowships will be accepted until Oct. 23 through the CCPS Application and Nomination Portal.

11/6 APPLES ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK APPLICATIONS

Applications are open for APPLES Alternative Spring Break, which takes place in the spring semester through both classroom interaction and an immersive experience for eight days during spring break in March. Participants attend classroom sessions that prepare them to engage in discussion and service centered on their chosen focus area: Latinx communities, rural communities, urban communities, civil rights and disaster relief. In this two-credit hour course (HBEH 610), students examine theories behind community service, coalition building, community asset development as well as specific needs and assets of the communities where they volunteer. Apply through the CCPS Application and Nomination Portal by Nov. 6.

11/17 – APPLES COMMUNITY PARTNER SUMMER INTERNSHIP APPLICATIONS

Community partners with growing needs or specialized projects are encouraged to apply to participate in the Service-Learning Internship program. Service-learning internships are open to full-time undergraduates and offer students the opportunity to participate in a deep and meaningful professional experience while partners work with some of the brightest students at UNC. Community partner summer internship applications are due Nov. 17. Learn more about hosting an intern.

11/27 – DISASTER RELIEF TRIP

The Carolina Center for Public Service continues to organize campus-wide relief trips to assist in the rebuilding process after Hurricane Matthew in Lumberton, North Carolina. These trips are for UNC staff, faculty and students who are willing to help with clean-up or who have specialized building and repair skills. The next trip is scheduled for Friday, Dec. 1. For details, FAQs and registration forms, visit UNC disaster relief trips.

INTERNSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS & AWARDS

10/23 – Social justice project grant funding

The Campus Y will host an interest meeting to learn more about the YFund and how organizations can receive grant money doing social justice-oriented work. The meeting is 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 23 in the Campus Y, third floor Cube. Applications are due Oct. 25 with pitch day on Oct. 28. Apply through the YFund. For more information, visit the Campus Y.

10/25 – Pupusas 4 Education internship

Pupusas 4 Education, a nonprofit that provides scholarships for undocumented students, is accepting applications for a paid internship position. The intern will be responsible for event planning, developing a fundraising strategy and conducting media outreach. This internship will run from November 2017 to May 2018. Apply by Oct. 25 at Pupusas 4 Education Project Internship Application.

11/6 – JESUIT VOLUNTEER CORPS NORTHWEST RECRUITMENT

The Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) Northwest will be on campus Monday, Nov. 6 for recruitment. JVC Northwest places and supports full-time Jesuit Volunteer (JV)/AmeriCorps members for a year of service focusing on the values of community, simple living, spirituality, and social and ecological justice. JVs live in intentional communities in urban and rural locales in Arkansas, Oregon, Washington, Montana and Indiana. Contact Megan Harsh to schedule a time to meet and visit JVC Northwest to learn more.

11/9 – PARENTS COUNCIL GRANT APPLICATION

The Parents Council is accepting applications for grants, awarded annually to UNC offices and student organizations to support new and innovative programs or events that benefit undergraduate students. Since its inception in 1985, these grants have provided more than $1.7 million dollars to enhance the quality of undergraduate student life and learning at Carolina. Apply at Parents Council Grant Program by Nov. 9.

EVENTS & MEETINGS

10/26 – Alternative spring break trip interest meeting

Students interested in doing community service in Ecuador or Nicaragua over spring break are invited to an interest meeting for Manna Project International alternative spring break trip. The meeting is at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26 in the Genome Science Building, room 1370. Learn more at Heel Life Manna Project International.

10/27-28 – Read.Write.Act virtual conference

The Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education (SCALE) promotes community literacy through its Read.Write.Act virtual conference. Presentations will provide models of civic and community engagement through literacy. Presentations are not limited reading and writing, and also include other forms of literacy such as digital literacy, health literacy and financial literacy. Register online for the conference and visit Read.Write.Act to learn more.

11/3 – Earthquake and disaster relief benefit concert

Local band Over The Hill will play a benefit concert for the Episcopal Relief and Development Fund and American Red Cross Disaster Relief. The show is Friday, Nov. 3 at the Church of the Holy Family in Chapel Hill. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the music starts at 7 p.m. Donations will be accepted to enter. For questions, contact Scott Madry or see Over the Hill band on Facebook.

11/4 & 19 – Ecuador earthquake relief trip

In 2016, a disastrous earthquake hit Bahia, Ecuador. Join UNC students traveling to Bahia to assist with disaster relief through sustainable bamboo design. Volunteers will participate in workshops to explore the history of bamboo architecture, concepts of sustainable design and social entrepreneurship, and students will build a new bamboo home with Bahia Beach Construction. An interest meeting will be held at 3 p.m. Nov. 4 and 2 p.m. Nov. 19 in Murray Hall, G201. For details, contact Lily Olmo.

11/14 & 15 – UNC Passport Drive

UNC Global will host its annual Global Passport Drive 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Nov. 14 and 15 in the FedEx Global Education Center, room 4003. Officials from the U.S. Department of State will accept passport applications, renewal applications and answer questions. Passport photos can be taken at the event for $7 (cash or check only) by UNC One Card office staff or before the event at the UNC One Card office. Applications are available at the event or can be downloaded from the U.S. State Department.

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PUBLIC SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES

10/16 – 11/7 – VOLUNTEER WITH KIDS VOTING DURHAM

Help children learn about voting and the democratic process through the Kids Voting Durham program. The busy season for Kids Voting Durham is from now until early November. Volunteers are needed to assist on Nov. 7 as well as in office through Nov. 7. For more information, contact Carolyn Kreuger. Visit Kids Voting Durham for more information.

Sign up to be a Dance Marathon dancer

Carolina For The Kids (CFTK) is recruiting dancers for the 2018 UNC Dance Marathon. Students pledge to raise $200 and remain on their feet for 24-hours to show their support for the patients and families of UNC Children’s Hospital. Dance Marathon is March 23 and 24. Register Oct. 23 – 27 in the Pit. Learn more at CFTK.

Compass Center seeks spring volunteers

Compass Center for Women and Families will offer a spring training for volunteers in mid-February. The Compass Center helps individuals and families prevent and end domestic violence and become self-sufficient, and navigate their journey to self-sufficiency, safety and health. Volunteers are needed to work as hotline advocates, court advocates, information and referral staff, translators and childcare volunteers. Contact Ashley Parks to volunteer or visit the Compass Center to learn more.

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CCPS WEBSITE – FIND US ON THE WEB

The Carolina Center for Public Service (wccps.unc.edu) features the latest information about the APPLES Service-LearningBuckley Public Service Scholars, and Faculty Engaged Scholars programs as well as details about Public Service Awards and Fellowships. You can also read stories of Carolina students, faculty and staff who are making a difference. The Carolina Center for Public Service: Connecting Carolina and Communities – be sure to bookmark the site. Learn more about what Carolina is doing in public service and engagement. Visit us online, follow us on Twitter at UNCServes or join us today on Facebook at Public Service and Engagement UNC Chapel Hill.

UNC’S DISASTER RESPONSE

Whenever disasters strike – in North Carolina, the United States or around the world – Carolina students, faculty and staff immediately ask, “What can we do to help?” If you are aware of disaster response or recovery efforts being coordinated on campus that you would like listed on this page, send an email to CCPS.

ABOUT OUR NEWSLETTER

The Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) publishes the Public Service News to keep students, faculty, staff and community members up-to-date on current public service resources, programs and volunteer opportunities. For more info on CCPS, please visit http://ccps.unc.edu. If you are involved in public service and would like to post an announcement, fill out our online request at http://ccps.unc.edu/news-events/public-service-news-listserv/next-weeks-listserv/. The deadline for inclusion is 5 p.m. on the Wednesday prior to Monday publication. The Public Service News is published only when class is in session, once per week during the academic year and bi-weekly during the summer sessions. To unsubscribe, click here or, send a blank email to leave-34847996-76489955.07b7484471051a00b41b3bf1990b60eb@listserv.unc.edu. Thank you.

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