Ned Brooks Award

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The Ned Brooks Award for Public Service honors the contributions and values of Ned Brooks, who has served the University since 1972, making significant contributions to the mission of service and engagement, including a leadership role in the development of the Carolina Center for Public Service. The award recognizes a staff or faculty member of the UNC-Chapel Hill community who throughout his/her career has, in a collaborative and sustained manner, made a difference in the larger community by:

  • encouraging active involvement of others in service to and engagement with the community beyond the University, and/or
  • directly providing public service beyond the University, and
  • mentoring, inspiring and providing opportunities for others to effectively make a difference in the larger community.

The award is based on a sustained record of service over a period of years carried out through the individual’s role(s) at the University rather than as a private citizen. All faculty and staff are eligible. One award is given annually.

Nominations are being accepted for the 2014 Ned Brooks. Full nominations are due Feb. 21 2014 and can be submitted online through the Carolina Center for Public Service Application & Nomination Portal.

Stephen Caiola, associate professor in the Eshelman School of Pharmacy received the 2013 Ned Brooks Award for Public Service. Named for Brooks, a faculty member and administrator at Carolina since 1972, the award recognizes a faculty or staff member who has built a sustained record of community service through individual efforts and has promoted the involvement and guidance of others. For more than four decades, Caiola has promoted public service through his work with UNC Hospitals and at the School of Pharmacy. After establishing the clinical pharmacy program at UNC Hospitals, he worked with Orange Chatham Comprehensive Health Service to move UNC into the community to improve the health care needs of the underserved. During that time, he also involved pharmacy students as charter members of the Student Health Action Coalition (SHAC), the oldest health affairs student-run clinic in the country. Tim Ivins, who nominated Caiola for the honor said that Caiola’s role at the University “is one of fulfilled service to others, largely through extending the health care to every city and town across the state and beyond.”